Tuesday, 14 May 2019 11:09

Bowtie for Boys tour Duke Energy

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The Fairview Heights Elementary School’s Bowtie for Boys Club toured the Duke Energy-Smith Energy Complex Monday morning. The Fairview Heights Elementary School’s Bowtie for Boys Club toured the Duke Energy-Smith Energy Complex Monday morning. Richmond County Schools

HAMLET — With their orange hard hats and signature Bowtie Boys T-shirts and khakis on, Fairview Heights Elementary School’s Bowtie for Boys Club toured the Duke Energy-Smith Energy Complex Monday morning.


The tour is also part of a partnership Evonne Moore, Fairview Heights Elementary School’s social worker who founded the Bowtie for Boys Club, has with Duke Energy. Last month, the company donated $1,000 to go towards snacks and T-shirts and during Christmas, Duke Energy donated $15,000 to help provide gifts for Richmond County School students in need.

Moore said she arranged the trip with Duke Energy to give students a chance to explore possible job opportunities if they can’t afford to go to college.

“We’re teaching them about workforce development that does not require going to a four-year college and there are other ways to get certificates to qualify for good paying jobs like at Duke (Energy),” said Moore.

During the tour, students had the opportunity to walk around with Operations Superintendent Marcus Canipe and Contract Resource Coordinator Jeff House and look at gas turbines, or simple cycle units, transformers, which students were warned to not bother if they see one in front of their homes, and listen to the hum of electricity throughout the facility.

After the tour, House questioned the students on important lessons they learned.

“If you see a power line down, don’t mess with it,” answered one student.

“Don’t leave a light on when you’re not in a room,” answered another on how to save electricity.

In addition to learning about the equipment and different ways to save energy, students were also given life lessons to take with them while they’re in school and while they’re home.

Terrence Vanderhorst, project manager, gave students two important pieces of advice for them to keep in mind — to know that they aren’t bad kids and to focus on the tasks in front of them, no matter how small.

“Don’t let anyone label you,” he said. “And stay focused.”