Displaying items by tag: history

When Europeans first came to the Americas in the middle of the last millennium, scholars estimate that there were roughly 60 million indigenous people here. And while the actions and motivations of those who immigrated to this hemisphere obviously ran the gamut, there is simply no denying that the impact on the native population was catastrophic.

Published in Opinion

RALEIGH — Could an obscure historical discovery force Wingate University and the town to change names? That question is roiling Wingate, a small Union County town 30 miles southeast of Charlotte.

Published in Local News

To those who ever harbored any doubts about how blatant and virulent the racism and white supremacy were that dominated North Carolina’s culture, law and politics well into the 20th century, Pulitzer Prize-winning author David Zucchino’s most recent book, "Wilmington’s Lie: The Murderous Coup of 1898 and the Rise of White Supremacy" is a “must read.”

Published in Opinion
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RALEIGH — The House has passed a bill that would prohibit the exclusive teaching of Critical Race Theory in North Carolina public school classrooms. The 66-48 vote on May 12 followed a scorched-earth debate in which Democrats called the measure anti-American and hateful, while Republicans countered that it was focused on ensuring equity in schools.

Published in Local News
Friday, 26 February 2021 11:16

COLUMN: The forgotten Seaburn Spring

The other week while it was raining, I was checking my computer about some history of Richmond County. I happened to run across a subject of waterways located in the county. I recognized all the names except one, and that was Seaburn Spring and Branch.

Published in Lifestyle
Wednesday, 10 February 2021 11:06

OPINION: The Left is damaging public education

“One of the most unhappy series of events in the state’s history began in 1835,” stated a textbook used in elementary schools across North Carolina. “As more and more white people came into their territory the Cherokee Indians had been driven further into the hills, but white settlers looked with greed on all their territory.”

Published in Opinion
Thursday, 28 January 2021 10:20

Republicans slam proposed social studies standards

RALEIGH — A N.C. State Board of Education meeting Wednesday, Jan. 27, became a flashpoint in the national debate over racism and American identity. Some Republicans complained proposed social studies standards were full of negativity, identity politics, and social agendas. Democrats argued that systemic racism exists, saying children should learn multiple perspectives on their country’s history.

Published in Local News

PEMBROKE — Nancy Strickland Fields, director and curator of the Museum of the Southeast American Indian at UNC Pembroke, has been elected to the Southeastern Museums Conference Board of Directors.

Published in Lifestyle

PEMBROKE — Drs. Malinda Maynor Lowery and Arwin Smallwood will facilitate a discussion titled “Sharing Black and Native Histories” as part of UNC Pembroke’s Virtual Diversity Series.

Published in Lifestyle
Wednesday, 09 September 2020 13:13

OPINION: Confederate monuments and history's erasure

Should Confederate monuments stay, or should they go? That debate has been raging for the last three years, and especially since June with the George Floyd and Black Lives Matter protests.

Published in Opinion
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