Displaying items by tag: richmond county

Wednesday, 17 October 2018 22:10

549 Richmond County Voters Cast Early Ballots

ROCKINGHAM — Several hundred Richmond County voters cast their ballots on the first day of early voting.

Deputy Elections Director Teresa Smith said there were two people waiting in line when the doors opened at the Cooperative Extension office at 7 a.m. Wednesday, adding that the crowd had been steady throughout the morning and into the early afternoon.

Twenty had voted before 8 a.m. and more than 300 had chosen their candidates by 1:30 p.m. The last voter — No. 549 — walked in with three minutes to spare.

Published in Local News

ROCKINGHAM — Tropical Storm Michael continues to dump rain in North Carolina and Virginia as it continues northward.

The weakened system made its way through Richmond County with heavy to moderate showers and gusty winds in the late morning hours into the afternoon.

Several roads — including Yates Hill Road, Airport Road and Ann Street — were reported to have flooded areas, according to a list set up by Jimmy Herring on the group Facebook page What’s Up Richmond County.

Published in Local News

ROCKINGHAM-- Nine candidates for four offices had a chance to mingle with voters and discuss their platforms Tuesday evening at Richmond Young Professionals’ Pints and Politics event.

Although not every candidate had an opponent present, they were still allowed to take questions from the audience.

The coverage of the forum is split into three parts: U.S. House of Representatives race; N.C. Senate and House of Representatives; Richmond County Board of Commissioners.

Congressional Seat a Pivotal Race

North Carolina’s 9th Congressional District race has become one of the most-watched contests in the nation, especially following Rep. Robert Pittenger’s defeat in the Republican primary by former Charlotte pastor Mark Harris.

Democrats are hoping to flip that seat with their young challenger, retired Marine Dan McCready.

A recent New York Times poll shows Harris leading McCready 47 percent to 42 percent, with 11 percent undecided.

Some of those undecided voters could swing toward Libertarian Jeff Scott, who wasn’t included in the poll, but was present at Tuesday’s forum.

Published in Local News

ROCKINGHAM — Some might think mixing alcohol and politics is a bad idea, but one local group is doing just that.

Richmond Young Professionals is hosting its second Pints and Politics event Tuesday, where constituents can have a brew or two and ask questions of candidates for office.

RYP member David Stogner said the addition of beer is a way to bring out some young adults who might not otherwise get involved.

“We thought it would lighten the mood a little bit,” he said. “We didn’t want it to be stale … just a light atmosphere, so people felt that they could have a one-on-one conversation with somebody running for office.”

Published in Local News

ROCKINGHAM — Gov. Roy Cooper visited Richmond County early Monday afternoon to thank first responders for their efforts during Hurricane Florence as he continues to tour affected areas.

The governor was greeted by Emergency Services Director Donna Wright and County Manager Bryan Land as he walked into the county Emergency Services Complex.

Wright gave him a very brief history of how the building came about as she led him to a conference room where photos of the county’s roads damaged during the storm were projected onto a screen. 

She also told them how her department helped take the 911 loads from other counties that lost communications.

“I really appreciate you guys stepping up and doing what you needed to do,” Cooper told Wright and the other first responders in the room, which included Sheriff James Clemmons and Rockingham’s police and fire chiefs, Billy Kelly and Harold Isler.

Published in Local News
Thursday, 27 September 2018 15:35

NC First Lady Kristin Cooper Tours Rockingham Middle

ROCKINGHAM — North Carolina’s First Lady got a glimpse of Richmond County’s public education system Thursday as she toured Rockingham Middle School.

Kristin Cooper was led around the campus by Principal Theresa Gardner and Superintendent Dr. Cindy Goodman, making short stops in various classrooms while teachers instructed in language arts, social studies, math and music.

After visiting the old-school auditorium, the governor’s wife briefly joined the chorus class, singing, clapping and swaying her hips to the song.

Published in Local News

HAMLET— For 10 years, one local mother has taken the phrase “pay it forward” to heart by helping other parents in similar situations.

Paula Thomas spent seven months in the Ronald McDonald House in Durham following the birth of her first child, Jada, who was born 23 weeks premature and diagnosed with cerebral palsy.

A few years later, Thomas decided to give back to the place that was a home away from home while her daughter, who is now 15, was hospitalized.

Thomas and the other members of Jada’s Helping Hands have held an annual fundraiser to benefit the Ronald McDonald House and families with young patients at Lenox Baker Children’s Hospital, Duke Children’s Health Center and Richmond County families with special needs children.

Published in Local News

“To Kill a Mockingbird.” “1984.” “Catcher in the Rye.” “Brave New World.” “The Lord of the Rings.”

What do all these books have in common?

Aside from being classic works of literature, they each have been challenged or banned for themes that some people find offensive in some way, according to the American Library Association.

Libraries in Richmond County and across America are celebrating Banned Books Week by prominently displaying copies of controversial titles.

“Every year, a list comes out of the top banned or challenged books,” said Shannon Hearne, supervisor of Leath Memorial Library in Rockingham. “And they might not necessarily be banned in locations but they’re all challenged … and it’s all for various reasons.”

Those reasons, according to the ALA, include: violence; being un-American; perpetuating sterotypes or racisim; having lesbian, bisexual, gay or transgender themes; foul language;  and occult references.

Promoting Banned Books Week, Hearne added, is to raise awareness about censorship and freedom of speech.

Published in Local News

ROCKINGHAM — Call it a wall-breaking ceremony.

Instead of golden shovels, local dignitaries and representatives from several foundations wielded golden hammers to strike the wall of a former men’s clothing store that will soon be the site of Richmond Community College’s downtown campus in Rockingham.

“What a great day for Richmond County, Rockingham and Richmond Community College,” RCC President Dr. Dale McInnis said at the start of Monday’s ceremony.

McInnis lauded how the campus was “a different kind of project,” with the way it was funded and because the city actually took the lead.

“It takes a team to make anything happen and we’ve got a great team here,” he said.

Rockingham Mayor Steve Morris said the idea for the downtown campus came about five years ago when Brian Collier, executive vice president of the Foundation for the Carolinas, took local leaders on a bus tour to Hartsville, South Carolina, and they saw how Coker College had impacted that town.

In 2015, McInnis said he was approached by Morris and Mayor Pro Tem John Hutchinson about building a satellite campus in the downtown area.

Published in Local News

CORDOVA — Although separated by 800 miles, two groups of firefighters formed a camaraderie in the midst of Hurricane Florence.

A FEMA-credentialed swiftwater task force comprised of firefighters from several departments in New Hampshire made the drive to Richmond County last week to work with Cordova Fire and Rescue.

“People have come up to help us in the past, so we’re just returning the favor,” said Patrick Laforge of the Goffstown Fire Department said Monday while waiting to try Eastern North Carolina-style barbecue at the East Rockingham Fire Department.

Joining Laforge from Goffstown was Chris Couturier as well as: Keith Folsom, Jon Strong and Capt. Ben Selleck from the Bedford Fire Department; Jeff Chickering, Dustin Holmes and Brad Keay from the Keene Fire Department; Tom Defina and Mike Meehan from the Manchester Fire Department; Cal Weichert and Darren Schriever from the Amherst Fire Department; and Garrett Meador and Chad McCarthy from the Conway and North Conway Fire Departments, respectively.

Although they weren’t needed much in Richmond County, last Sunday night they rescued more than 30 people from homes and cars in Laurinburg as the parts of the city began to flood.

Published in Local News
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