Local News

Local News

Keep up-to-date on the latest news from Richmond County

ROCKINGHAM - As part of the ongoing mission of the Richmond Observer to provide expansive coverage of current events of interest, we offer the following insight from State Representative Ken Goodman regarding upcoming constitutional amendment considerations. 

HAMLET - A called meeting was held at the Richmond County Board of Education at 118 Vance Street in Hamlet on Tuesday, July 17, at 5:00 p.m.  A quorum of school board members was present for the meeting, which was called to order by Board Chairman Wiley Mabe. A moment of silence was observed, followed by the Pledge of Allegiance. The agenda was adopted as presented.

Business items followed as some changes were requested for the 2018-2019 school calendar by Dennis Quick, executive director of Auxiliary Services. The professional development day scheduled for January 29, 2019, needs to be moved to January 30, 2019, to better coincide with the Richmond Community College Calendar. A similar request was made for changing a professional development day from February 19, 2019, to February 20, 2019, for the same reason. This request was approved with no opposition.

RALEIGH – The N.C. Agricultural Development and Farmland Preservation Trust Fund recently awarded more than $4.6 million to help communities across the state protect farmland and promote agricultural enterprises. Conservation easements were obtained on 2,590 acres of land across the state through the grants. 

“This is an important day for farm families in North Carolina,” said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. “These easements ensure that these working farms remain in production for many years to come and help to keep agriculture as our state’s top industry.”

The following is a list of awarded projects:

  • Alamance County received $181,935 to preserve 88 acres of a dairy farm and $164,805 for a conservation easement on 75 acres of cropland.
  • Beaufort Soil and Water Conservation District received $147,855 to help purchase a perpetual conservation easement on 159 acres of cropland.
  • Buncombe Soil and Water Conservation District received $198,650 to help purchase a perpetual conservation easement on an 85-acre farm and $268,950 to preserve 135 acres of farm and forestland.
  • Cabarrus Soil and Water Conservation District received $116,516 to preserve 59 acres of cropland.
  • Conserving Carolina received $327,250 to help purchase a perpetual conservation easement on 75 acres of a farm in Henderson County.
  • Duplin Soil and Water Conservation District received $47,474 to help purchase a 20-year term conservation easement on 246 acres of cropland.
  • Eno River Association received $39,655 to help purchase a perpetual conservation easement on a 37-acre farm in Orange County and $84,460 to preserve 56 acres of farm and forestland in Orange County.
  • Foothills Conservancy of North Carolina received $273,125 to purchase a perpetual conservation easement on a 194-acre farm in Burke County.
  • Haywood Soil and Water Conservation District received $269,979 for a conservation easement on a 34-acre farm and $202,220 to preserve 49 acres of a beef cattle farm.
  • The LandTrust for Central North Carolina received $135,425 to preserve a 135-acre farm in Randolph County.
  • Mainspring Conservation Trust received $635,727 to help purchase a perpetual conservation easement on 192 acres of cropland in Cherokee County and $114,025 to preserve a 31-acre farm in Cherokee County.
  • Mitchell Soil and Water Conservation District received $80,437 to help purchase a perpetual conservation easement on a 108-acre farm.
  • The N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services will use $27,554 for transaction costs on a donated perpetual conservation easement of 15 acres in Jackson County.
  • Orange County received $64,000 for a perpetual conservation easement on a 68-acre farm.
  • Piedmont Land Conservancy received $180,285 to help purchase a perpetual conservation easement on 110 acres of a dairy farm in Randolph County and $468,255 to preserve a 154-acre farm in Rockingham County.
  • Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy received $190,000 for a perpetual conservation easement on 125 acres of a beef cattle farm in Mitchell County and $61,250 to preserve an 89-acre farm in Mitchell County.
  • The Southwestern N.C. Resource Conservation and Development Council received $128,484 for a perpetual conservation easement on 20-acre farm in Haywood County.
  • Swain Soil and Water Conservation District received $65,800 for a project to expand facilities for Swain County High School’s FFA animal husbandry program.
  • Triangle Land Conservancy received $62,045 to preserve a 34-acre farm in Chatham County.
  • The Working Lands Trust received $20,758 to help purchase a perpetual conservation easement on 108 acres of forestland in Halifax County and $87,819 to preserve a 106-acre farm in Caswell County.

The N.C. Beehive Grant Fund awarded $25,000 for 17 grants. These grants are for certified beekeepers for beehives and materials to create beehives with a maximum grant of $2,400. The N.C. Beehive Grant Fund received over 340 eligible applications, totaling over $500,000 in grant requests.

The following is a list of awarded beehive grants:

  • Gary Shoemake of Brunswick County
  • Phillip Barfield of Caswell County
  • Paul Coy Jr. of Craven County
  • Kenneth Randall of Dare County
  • Ryan Chamberlain of Durham County
  • Leigh Arnold of Forsyth County
  • Paul McMahan of Gaston County
  • Tammy Blake of Hyde County
  • Jim Rosensteel of Lee County
  • Russell Schmidt of McDowell County
  • Michael Munley of Mecklenburg County
  • Michelle Mejia of Mitchell County
  • Barry Harris of New Hanover County
  • Richard Thomas of Perquimans County
  • Gladys Hutson of Union County
  • Tom Wells of Wake County
  • Kurt Ullberg of Wilson County

Editor's note:  It is the policy of the Richmond Observer to print news release material in its original format, as it was received, with minimal, if any, editorial adjustments. 

 

 

Thursday, 19 July 2018 05:04

McColl to Host Charity Wrestling Event

Written by

 McColl - Everyone meet Thomas.

Thomas has up to 170 mini seizures a day.

Each one damages his brain even more.

The doctors told the family that if he didn't have the surgery he would only have a year to live.

We all know the price of surgery alone.

But his parents will have to miss work and live in a motel next to the hospital.

Please spread the word and come out and help us help Thomas's family financially.

100% of the proceeds go to the family.

Come out and enjoy some great professional wrestling.

It's for a great cause.

Thank you

CWE

Editor's note: The event will be held this Saturday, July 21st in McColl.

Address is 400 South Main Street in McColl, SC.

Doors open at 6:00 p.m. for the 7:30 p.m. commencement of the event.

Admission is $5 for kids 3-10 and $10 otherwise.

 

Thursday, 19 July 2018 05:06

Kimberly Dawn Grooms, Gold Medal Winner

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ROCKINGHAM - A welcoming and loving crowd of family and friends was on hand Saturday afternoon, July 14, at La Cabana Mexican Restaurant in Rockingham, for Kimberly Dawn Grooms, the one athlete that represented Richmond County in the 2018 Special Olympics USA Games the first week of July in Seattle, Washington.

The goal of the national competition was to “showcase the abilities of athletes with intellectual disabilities, promote the ideals of acceptance and inclusion through sport, and celebrate the transformative power of Special Olympics.”

PINEHRUST – U.S. Army soldier Christina Griggs was exhausted. Was it due to her job overseeing training operations and staffing for 1,500 soldiers? Or her busy family life with her husband and two children—plus a menagerie of pets, including dogs, chickens, a cat and rabbits?

That lifestyle would be a challenge for most. But the true cause of Griggs’ fatigue was also the long-misdiagnosed cause of her urinary incontinence (leaking of urine), constant pain in her abdomen, and the urge to go to the bathroom all the time—night and day.

Thursday, 19 July 2018 05:02

Agricultural News and National Events

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ROCKINGHAM - As part of the ongoing mission of the Richmond Observer to provide expansive coverage of current events, we offer the following links to allow ease of access to breaking news and/or items of immediate interest garnering attention across the state and/or nation.  These particular links relate to items of agricultural interests and/or national events.

 

Hamlet, N.C. (July 16, 2018) – To meet the growing demand for law enforcement professionals, Richmond Community College and Columbia College have signed a new articulation agreement to create clear pathways to advanced degrees in criminal justice.  

The new articulation agreement will allow students to obtain an Associate in Applied Science from RichmondCC and then go on to complete online a Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice through Columbia College, which is located in Columbia, S.C. Columbia College also offers students a “4+1” program, which allows students to obtain a bachelor’s and master’s degree in criminal justice in just five years.  

“Opportunities in public safety and law enforcement are growing rapidly, and higher education is the key to achieving greater earning potential and command level positions,” said Patsy Stanley, director of Career and College Transfer at RichmondCC. “A bachelor’s degree in criminal justice is the standard for advancement in law enforcement, corrections, homeland security, emergency management and related areas.” 

Renowned for its criminal justice program, Columbia College is one of only 16 schools in the United States that partner with the FBI Academy Alliance. 

“This articulation agreement with Columbia College is designed to create convenient and affordable options for our students to continue their education and pursue a career in law enforcement and public service,” said Dr. McInnis, president of RichmondCC. “We are grateful to Columbia College for this partnership and for opening its doors to our North Carolina students.” 

RichmondCC students who finish an Associate in Applied Science in Criminal Justice will be able to immediately continue in Columbia College’s online Bachelor of Arts Criminal Justice program with a choice to concentrate in Forensics or Leadership and Risk Management. The new agreement guarantees up to 90 credit hours can be transferred to Columbia College, which leaves only 30 credit hours required to earn a bachelor’s degree. 

To achieve the Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice, students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average. Advantages of the new articulation agreement include:

·        Students can apply for free.

·        As an all-inclusive program, eBooks are provided for all classes.   

·        Six start dates each year so multiple opportunities to enroll.

·        Full-time students who are South Carolina residents may qualify for the South Carolina Tuition Grant.

For additional information about transfer opportunities available through RichmondCC, contact Director of Career and Transfer Services Patsy Stanley at (910) 410-1830 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Editor's note:  It is the policy of the Richmond Observer to print news release material in its original format, as it was received, with minimal, if any, editorial adjustments. 

Wednesday, 18 July 2018 05:02

Agricultural News

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ROCKINGHAM - As part of the ongoing mission of the Richmond Observer to provide expansive coverage of current events, we offer the following links to allow ease of access to breaking news and/or items of immediate interest garnering attention across the state and/or nation.  These particular links relate to items of agricultural interests.

HAMLET - Although there was a light turnout from area citizens for the Wednesday, July 11 session of “Coffee with A Cop” at the Hamlet Senior Center at 102 Veterans’ Drive, this time taken from the busy schedule of the Hamlet Police Department allowed an opportunity to plan for establishing drop-off points for school supplies for the upcoming 2018-2019 year.

Officers present included Police Chief Scott Waters, School Resource Officer Anne Griffin, Patrol Captain Marc Terry, Captain Detective Randy Dover, Lieutenant Detective Richard Jordan, Patrolman Brandon Cribb, Sergeant Detective Lampley, Sergeant Anthony Jacobs, and K-9 Officer Greg Stone.

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