Local News

Local News

Keep up-to-date on the latest news from Richmond County

ROCKINGHAM — A third COVID-related death for the week was reported Thursday morning by the Richmond County Health Department, bringing the month’s total to five.

Thursday, 21 October 2021 14:14

Walk-away offender sought in Scotland County

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LAURINBURG — Prison emergency response teams and local law enforcement are searching for offender Richard Alexander Mundy, #0296162, who left a work detail today in Scotland County.

RALEIGH — A new study from researchers at the University of Arkansas and Western Carolina University finds that a Democrat-backed budget bill pending in Congress would slash an average of $1,131 per student in resources for charter schools.

RALEIGH — The N.C. House in a concurrence vote passed House Bill 264, Emergency Powers Accountability Act, 66-44, on Wednesday, Oct. 20. Specifically, the legislation requires the governor to get concurrence from the Council of State for an emergency declaration lasting more than seven days.

ROCKINGHAM — Placards bearing the names of 45 domestic violence victims from across North Carolina dot the lawn of the old Richmond County courthouse.

ROCKINGHAM — John J. Jackson, president, southern region and administrator, FirstHealth Moore Regional Hospital-Richmond, has announced he plans to retire on Feb. 18, 2022, after 23 years of service to FirstHealth.

RALEIGH— The N.C. Department of Transportation’s crews, contractors and volunteers have collected more than 11 million pounds of litter from roadsides, exceeding the state’s record for litter collection set in 2019.

RALEIGH — A youth risk survey for middle- and high-school students in the public school system is raising eyebrows for asking students about drug use and sexual activity.

ROCKINGHAM — The long-awaited N.C. Festival of Ballooning came to the Richmond County Airport this weekend with thousands attending, including many from out of state.

RALEIGH — As COVID-19 cases surged this summer fueled by the Delta variant, hospitalizations and deaths among residents in North Carolina long-term care facilities were significantly lower than during the winter surge, as shown in data from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. The decrease in cases and severe illness can be attributed to vaccination for residents and staff of long-term care facilities and to the work done by long-term care providers to implement measures to protect staff and residents from COVID-19.

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