Tuesday, 24 September 2019 20:26

Flowers, other flora traded at Richmond County plant swap

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Paige Burns, county director for the N.C. Cooperative Extension office, gives advice on plant care during a plant swap Tuesday afternoon. Paige Burns, county director for the N.C. Cooperative Extension office, gives advice on plant care during a plant swap Tuesday afternoon. William R. Toler - Richmond Observer

ROCKINGHAM — Several people walked away from the Hitchcock Creek Greenway with new plants Tuesday afternoon and County Cooperative Extension Director Paige Burns walked away with none — which she considers a success.

The county’s first-ever plant swap, organized by Sharon Nichols, brought several people out to the park to trade trees, flowers and other flora.

“There was sort of a flurry of activity there at the end, so I think it went well,” Burns said.

She said there were several people who were at the park that were invited to walk over to the picnic shelter and take their pick.

“Plants are a great way to meet new people,” Burns said, who was there to answer questions about growing conditions and how to care for the plants, as she’s also the horticulture agent

Also up for grabs were several perennials which included a dragon wing begonia and a Creeping Jenny. There were also a variety of cedar, pine and oak saplings fresh for the taking, as well as a small fig tree.

Burns brought several items, including a chocolate mint plant, which went home with Judy Cagle.

Although she would have liked to have a few more people in attendance, Burns was satisfied with the first-time turnout.

She said there will likely be another, possibly in the spring, and would like to see the swap turn into a biannual event.

“I’d like to see it expand and more people get involved,” she said.

Burns added that there are more items attendees could trade that are plant-related, but not plants: garden ornaments, extra seeds, books and tools.

“Maybe you’re not gardening quite so much anymore and you want someone else to have your tools,” she said. “I think there’s all kinds of things (people) can bring into this.”