Tuesday, 14 January 2020 20:27

Recognition highlights Rockingham City Council meeting

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Rockingham Steve Morris presents Jane Covington, widow of the late David Covington, with a medal from the Carnegie Hero Fund Commission. David Covington was awarded the medal for saving a little girl who was being attacked by dogs last January. Rockingham Steve Morris presents Jane Covington, widow of the late David Covington, with a medal from the Carnegie Hero Fund Commission. David Covington was awarded the medal for saving a little girl who was being attacked by dogs last January. William R. Toler - Richmond Observer

ROCKINGHAM — Seven police officers and a now-deceased hero were recognized at Tuesday’s City Council meeting.

Rockingham Mayor Steve Morris presented a medal from the Carnegie Hero Fund Commission to the family of the late David Covington.

He was announced as one of the 13 American and three Canadian recipients of the award in September.

Covington is hailed as a hero for saving the life of then-6-year-old Haiden Prevatte when she was attacked by two pit bulls after getting off the bus in January 2019.

Covington, who was 72, told the investigating deputy that he was following the bus and saw two dogs attack the girl, according to the report. He said that he “grabbed a stick from the ditch and beat the dogs” away from the victim.

Covington died of natural causes in May.

The bronze medal, which features an image of industrialist-philanthropist Andrew Carnegie on the front and Covington’s name on the back, was presented to the hero’s widow, Jane Covington, and nephew, Richmond County Sheriff’s Deputy Chris Smith.

Council members Gene Willard and Anne Edwards said they both knew Covington, Willard for nearly 50 years, and that he was quiet and humble.

“I’m sure he didn’t have second thoughts about doing what he did, because that’s the kind of person he was,” Edwards said.

Following the presentation of the medal, the crowd gave a standing ovation — something Councilman John Hutchinson he’s never seen for a resident for something they’ve done during his years on the council.

Rockingham Police Chief Billy Kelly later took the podium to recognize several officers under his command with certificates earned through the Law Enforcement Officers’ Professional Certificate Program.

Four officers — Sgt. Lee Leviner, Officer David Gallops, Detective Joshua Leviner and Lt. Matt Baldwin — each were awarded their Advanced Law Enforcement Certificates.

Three officers — Evan Frye, Joshua Lampley and Franklin Smith — each completed the program to earn the Intermediate Certificate.

Under the guidelines in the professional certificate program, an officer qualifies for the Intermediate Certificate if he or she:

  • Has accumulated at least 32 education and/or training points and at least eight years experience; or
  • Has accumulated at least 40 education and/or training points and at least six years experience; or
  • Has accumulated at least 48 education and/or training points and at least four years experience; or
  • Has an Associate Degree issued by an academic institution recognized by the United States Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation; has accumulated at least 16 training points and at least four years experience, or
  • Has a Baccalaureate Degree issued by an academic institution recognized by the United States Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation; has accumulated at least eight training points and at least two years experience.

An officer qualifies for the Advanced Certificate if he or she:

  • Meets the requirements for the Intermediate Certificate; and
  • Has accumulated at least 48 education and/or training points and at least 12 years experience; or
  • Has accumulated at least 60 education and/or training points and at least nine years experience; or
  • Has an Associate Degree issued by an academic institution recognized by the United States Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation; has accumulated at least 36 training points and at least nine years experience; or
  • Has a Baccalaureate Degree issued by an academic institution recognized by the United States Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation; has accumulated at least 24 training points and at least six years experience; or
  • Has a Graduate or Professional Degree issued by an academic institution recognized by the United States Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation; has accumulated at least 16 training points and at least four years experience.

Although it wasn’t on the agenda, City Manager Monty Crump introduced a resolution regarding interim financing of the Richmond Community College downtown campus.

The project, which is running behind schedule, was slated to be complete by Dec. 2 with classes starting this semester.

“We’re working to get a handle on that,” Crump said. “We had some issues with a major subcontractor … but since our last meeting with them, we’ve seen some pretty significant progress.”

The council approved the resolution unanimously.

Crump also told the council that the 2019 safety reports show no reportable accidents in any of the city’s departments. He said is the first time he recalls that achievement since he began working with the city in the early ‘80s.

“That’s outstanding when you consider … all the jobs we have that are confined space, working on the highways, working in adverse conditions, working in the middle of the night,” he said. “They fact they could go a full year with no reportable injuries is absolutely phenomenal.”

Every department is eligible for the gold award through the N.C. Department of Labor, Crump added.

Morris also read aloud a resolution adopted to recognize Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

 

 

 

Last modified on Tuesday, 14 January 2020 20:41