Wednesday, 05 February 2020 14:38

RichmondCC rolls out plan to help former students complete college

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Richmond Community College counselors, from left, Crystal Shaw, Melanie Baker and Chris Gardner are ready to meet one-on-one with potential students and create a Personal Completion Plan to help them attain a college degree or diploma. Richmond Community College counselors, from left, Crystal Shaw, Melanie Baker and Chris Gardner are ready to meet one-on-one with potential students and create a Personal Completion Plan to help them attain a college degree or diploma. RCC

HAMLET — Richmond Community College is rolling out a new Personal Completion Plan for around 300 students who started college but never graduated with a degree, diploma or certificate. 

“We’ve been able to identify these students as having a high potential for completion,” said Vice President of Student Services Sharon Goodman. “Our goal is to connect with these former students and develop a personal plan to overcome any obstacles that may prevent them from returning and completing their college education.”

According to a new report from the National Student Clearinghouse, there are 36 million American adults with some college but no degree. Of those adults in North Carolina, 11 percent have characteristics of students most likely to return to college and complete their degrees.

Many of the students RichmondCC has identified for potential completion have 24 or more college credits. With a few more classes under their belt, they could earn a diploma or degree certificate depending on their program.

“Many of these students started college and then life happened,” Goodman said. “What we want them to know is that we can create a flexible class schedule and a doable timeline for completion. We can help them if they have any special needs to be successful in the classroom or need financial assistance to offset the cost of college. Our counselors are ready to meet one on one with these students and lay out a Personal Completion Plan that works best for them.”

RichmondCC offers day, evening and online classes to help students who need flexible scheduling options to work around family and employment obligations. 

The National Student Clearinghouse report also noted that community colleges are the most popular route for eventual completion.

“We want to do our part in getting these students back on track to earning their college education,” Goodman said. 

RichmondCC has expanded its co-admission programs with four-year colleges and universities, giving students easier access to more bachelor degree programs. Among those co-admission partners include the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, the University of North Carolina-Wilmington, North Carolina A&T State University and East Carolina University. These programs, such as C-Step, the Spartan Passage, Partners in Excellence, Aggie Plus or Pirate Promise, provide a seamless transition into a bachelor degree program for community college students who complete at RichmondCC first.

Former RichmondCC students who have been identified as potential completers will be notified through postcards, emails and text messages. 

“We encourage those folks to give us a chance and come talk to one of our counselors and see how they can advance or change their careers,” said Dr. Dale McInnis, RichmondCC president. “We have expanded our campus in Scotland County, and we’ll soon have a new facility in downtown Rockingham. It’s an exciting time at RichmondCC, and we want every former student to come back and let us help them change their lives.”

To learn more about RichmondCC, call 910-410-1700 or visit www.richmondcc.edu.