HAMLET— While Richmond County was spared the type of destruction experienced by other counties in North Carolina from Hurricane Florence, some first responders are doing what they can to help others.

At noon Thursday, the Hamlet Police Department began filling its enclosed traffic trailer with donated supplies. Although officers haven’t yet determined where the supplies will be going, Capt. Randy Dover said residents in Robeson County will more than likely be the recipients … again.

“We did it for Hurricane Matthew and the community really turned out for that,” Dover said, adding that the trailer “was pretty full” in 2016.

Scotland County, which is also dealing with flooding, is a possibility, but Dover said Robeson County is “the main concern.”

Dover was born and raised in Scotland County and said he’s “never seen flooding like this.”

Published in Local News
Thursday, 20 September 2018 22:23

NWS: Florence Remnant Could Return to Carolinas

ROCKINGHAM— Florence may not be finished with the Carolinas just yet.

A remnant of the once-Category 4 hurricane that devastated parts of North and South Carolina over the weekend could be headed this way.

According to the National Weather Service, a low pressure system left over from Florence has looped back around and currently has gale-force winds. As of 8:07 p.m. Thursday, the system was 100 miles northeast of Bermuda heading southwest at 15 mph.

While the probability is only 20 percent, meteorologists say the low could develop tropical characteristics over the next five days.

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ROCKINGHAM — There are currently nine roads closed in Richmond County in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence, according to the North Carolina Department of Transportation.

Some of the roads could be open as early as this week, while others may take a month or two to repair.

Derby Road is closed due to flooding between McBride Road and Sycamore Lane north of Hoffman. DOT officials expect it to be open again by Sept. 27.

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ROCKINGHAM — Richmond County was spared the severity of damage from Hurricane Florence seen by surrounding counties and Emergency Services Director Donna Wright contributes that to prayer and early planning.

“We were very fortunate,” she said early Tuesday afternoon on the flooded banks of Hitchcock Creek in Cordova. “That storm literally split and went around east and west of Richmond County.

“If you’ll look at the radar, the thinner bands actually are what were over us,” she continued. “The harder, more dangerous (weather) came to Scotland and to Anson and went up to Moore … 20 miles east or west could have been us, it was supposed to have been us … it was prayer (that kept the county out of danger).”

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