Displaying items by tag: school choice

RALEIGH — Redistricting could prove contentious in next year’s legislative session.

Published in Local News

RALEIGH — Traditional public school wasn’t working for Charlonda Brown’s two sons. 

Published in Local News

RALEIGH — Follow the money, the saying goes. In this year’s elections in North Carolina, the money leans left. School choice is the target. You can see it in the race for state superintendent and, subtly, in the fight for state Supreme Court.

Published in Local News

RALEIGH — The U.S. Supreme Court has struck down a rule banning religious private schools from participating in scholarship programs.

Published in Local News

RALEIGH — The Republican and Democratic candidates for state superintendent had similar positions on the causes of school re-segregation and the need to find common ground.

Published in Local News

I am a glass-half-full kind of person, so while we could focus on the criticisms and some of the setbacks related to expanding educational freedom to more families, there is much more to celebrate than to lament. As National School Choice Week kicks off, it’s a great time to spotlight the growing variety and abundance of education options available to parents and young people.

Published in Opinion

RALEIGH — North Carolinians strongly believe parents are the ultimately authority when it comes to educating their children, a new poll from the conservative-leaning Civitas Institute shows.

Published in Local News

RALEIGH — The N.C. Senate on Wednesday, May 8, sparred over a pair of school choice bills that would expand eligibility for private school vouchers and lift the enrollment cap on virtual charter schools.

Published in Local News

RALEIGH — Raleigh Charter High School is one of the top schools in the country, but it’s not what one would call a typical public school. 

Published in Local News

As a policy analyst and opinion journalist, I have spent much of my career advocating the expansion of choice and competition in education. I purposefully use both of those terms, because I think that families making choices and schools competing for students are distinct but mutually reinforcing mechanisms for improving educational outcomes.

Published in Opinion
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