Displaying items by tag: social media

The year may be new, but its problems are old. As 2022 gets underway, we find our society yet again grappling with pandemic policies, school closings, and the content moderation practices of Big Tech.

Published in Opinion

It's official: The company that runs Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp has a new name, Meta Platforms, Inc. The company's focus, according to its introductory announcement, "will be to bring the metaverse to life and help people connect, find communities and grow businesses."

Published in Opinion

On Oct. 5, former Facebook product manager Frances Haugen testified before the U.S. Senate, decrying her former employer's "destructive impact" and warning that "without action, divisive and extremist behaviors we see today are only the beginning."

Published in Opinion

RALEIGH — Complaints on social media from a left-wing redistricting activist are drawing fire from a state Senate redistricting leader. He accuses the activist of "begging" people to deliver her scripted remarks during public hearings.

Published in Local News

To the editor:

Trust in facts is a cornerstone of American democracy. Disinformation and distrust of the media have been major contributors to our socially, politically and economically polarized society.

Published in Opinion

"If [Donald] Trump and [Bernie] Sanders take the same position on Big Tech censorship," David Catron writes at The American Spectator, "the issue deserves serious attention."

Published in Opinion

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today continues its “Dirty Dozen” scam series with a warning to taxpayers to watch out for unexpected schemes in the form of emails, text or social media messages and phone calls. 

Published in Local News
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In 1969, the U.S. Supreme Court held, in Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District, that students don't "shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate." Schools may only prohibit, censor, or punish student speech which would "materially and substantially interfere with the requirements of appropriate discipline in the operation of the school."

Published in Opinion

Before they vote to make online impersonation a crime, state senators should chew the fat with Jim Ardis.

Published in Opinion

There's been a lot of talk about individuality these days, and the acceptance of such and how we should just all accept each other's differences and live our lives. I guess that's one of those things that sounds good in theory but when it's actually implemented, is about as useful as you know what on a bull. 

Published in Opinion
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