Thomas Mills

Thomas Mills

Wednesday, 16 January 2019 14:24

COLUMN: Folt bolts, takes Sam with her

So it looks like the UNC Board of Governors has run off another employee.

UNC-CH Chancellor Carol Folt announced she’s leaving at the end of the academic year, just weeks after UNC President Margaret Spellings announced her resignation.

Wednesday, 09 January 2019 17:36

COLUMN: New faces, new expectations

Democrats start the first full week of 2019 in a better position than they’ve had in years. The new Congress was sworn in last week and Nancy Pelosi took the Speaker’s gavel again. My #NCPOL twitter feed was full of new legislators taking the oath of office this weekend and now neither chamber of the legislature holds veto proof majorities. 

Tuesday, 01 January 2019 23:47

COLUMN: Reflections and predictions

It’s that time of year for reflections and predictions. In 2018, I didn’t make too many predictions. The ones I made were relatively vague and I was generally right. I said that Trump would not get impeached or be removed by the 25th Amendment. I was right, but at the beginning of the year, a lot of people believed he would be gone before the end of the year.

Thursday, 27 December 2018 17:45

COLUMN: The fraudulent argument for voter ID

Nobody was too surprised that the voter ID amendment passed in November. The argument for voter ID is easy. We need photo IDs to do a lot of things besides voting. We need them to get into bars. We need them to pick up prescriptions from pharmacies. To people who don’t live and breathe politics, a voter ID at the polls makes sense.

Back in the day, North Carolina had a long session of the legislature in odd-numbered years and short session of the legislature in even years. During the long session, the General Assembly passed a budget that would serve the state for two years. It was based on revenue projections. In the short session, which was supposed to last about three weeks, the legislature would reconvene to make adjustments to the budget based on actual revenue and changes in the projections. 

Election fraud has been happening in counties around the state for years but law enforcement generally ignored it, according to an article in the News & Observer. Most of it took place in rural counties and centered around local elections, even if some of it bled over into the state and federal ones. State and local law enforcement officials were more interested in bigger fish like council of state members, U.S. Senators and legislators than sewer and water authorities or even county commission races.

Watching Republicans yell “But the Democrats!” on Twitter in response to the election fraud in the 9th Congressional District race has been very entertaining. It’s also given new meaning to the term "election projection." The twitter warrior who goes by the handle Sister Toldjah has been “documenting” the history of election misconduct in Bladen County, always pointing to Democrats’ culpability in the process. Raleigh Attorney Brent Woodcox who serves as special counsel to the Republicans in the General Assembly has been desperately trying to point fingers at Roy Cooper’s 2016 campaign.

Monday, 26 November 2018 20:18

COLUMN: Racial politics laid bare

With the Mississippi runoff for U.S. Senate taking place tomorrow, the South and its racial history played prominently in the news this week. A New York Times article this weekend said that Democrats speaking frankly about race risk alienating rural white voters who are already moving toward Republicans. Other articles highlighted Mississippi Republican Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith sending her daughter to a segregationist academy like the one she attended as a girl. Clearly, we haven’t reached the post-racial America envisioned by conservatives like Chief Justice John Roberts.